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Archive for the ‘english’ Category

The new word I’ve learned today is..”whatchamacallit”.

If I put it in Japanese, I think “nan-tooka-kan-tooka” is close to Engish meaning.

For example, “I forgot that name of the singer, aaahhh, anyway, that nan-tooka-kan-tooka has a great voice!”

I want to know an English word for “alle-kolle” too.

I use it in a phrase like this; “ I couldn’t watch the movie last night, because I had had alle-kolle (this and that/ various things) I had to do.”

Do you have any?

Whatchamacallit, umm it sounds cute, doesn’t it?

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The words I learned today.

From the history of my electric dictionary,

*whereas

*breach

*hereunder

*applicable

*waive

*thereof

*arbitration

*herein

*whereof

They are in the different category of vocabulary from my Johnny Depp….

Do anyone know any site that explain these jargons with easier terms?

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As the title says, I am going to work for a part-time job as an office clerk from the day after tomorrow. It will be the first time since I quitted the previous job 10 years ago!!!  I’m a bit scared now.  I’ve been at home with my kids for 10 years. For me, the days as an office clerk before is still vivid. I can still remember the name of companies they associated with then. However, in this 10 years, many of those companies, even that my company I was working at,  has been disappeared because of this bad economic. I don’t know if I could be good enough to keep up with the speed of  the business world of these days…

They hired me because I could use English. However, honestly, I’ve never used English in business!!!

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On the English radio program, I heard that they used the word ‘honcho’  for their company’s CEO. Is it common to you? You know the word ‘honcho’ is originated from the Japanese word ‘班長/hancho’ , which means ‘a head chief’.  But it sounds strange for me to use it for the company’s CEO. In Japan, ‘honcho‘ is used for a leader of a small group consisted with 5 or 6 members. It reminds me like a  group for the school trip or a small troop of army. On the other hand, the word ‘CEO’ is now commonly used in Japan. 

On more thing I didn’t know is you use ‘sukosh‘ to mean ‘a little bit’  like ” I want sukosh piece of cake”. It’s from the Japanese word ‘sukoshi‘. Have you ever used it or heard of it?  I can understand you import some foreign ‘noun’ words, but I wonder why an adjective word like ‘sukosh‘ has become an English word. Why only ‘ sukosh‘? You might know any other adjective words Japanese origin?

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Baka and Aho

Both of these two Japanese words, ‘baka’ and ‘aho’, means an idiot or a fool. In the western Japan, you use ‘aho’ more often than ‘baka’, and it doesn’t necessarily mean a real idiot. You can use it like ‘What a aho you are!/あほやなあ!” to your friend or kids. But it doesn’t sound really blame them.  Maybe the person who’s said so wouldn’t be so much upset, even you can make he/she feel easy. On the contrary, if you use  ‘baka‘ instead, they might feel humiliated. Kids might be intimidated if I used it for them.

However, it’s the usage in the western Japan, especially, in Kansai area. I’ve heard that in Tokyo area, they use ‘baka’  more often like ‘aho’ of Kanasi, and they feel uneasy to use ‘aho‘ to others.

Anyway, I checked the English words for ‘baka‘ and ‘aho’, and was amazed!  How many words you have in English that means an idiot! Here is the page on the web dictionary. I know some  of them like, dumb, jackass, knob-head, stupid, tosser, nuts, moron and retard.  I picked the most of them in the movies. You learn ‘fool’ ‘idiot’ and ‘stupid’ in the English class in school. I guess in these words there are some you should not use in public otherwise people take you as an idiot, too?  I should not use ‘jackass’, right?  I wonder the reason why you have so many words and terms for an idiot in English, I guess maybe you wouldn’t care so much to say these words. I mean, you sort of joke? You should not take it so seriously like ‘aho‘ in western Japan?

Anyway, I want you to choose one good word that I can use to yell at the small team of policemen who failed to trap the young gang  playing firecrackers at the midnight in the beach in front of my house!

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Do you really want to party?

I’ve just come back home from a party held by a German couple. It was nice. The people were frank and international. The meals were really delicious, too. But got exhausted because I had to keep talking loudly in a noisy room and you know, you’re supposed to keep yourself up in such a place, right?

The party. There is no such a habit in a normal Japanese society. I mean some Japanese who work with westerners or likes the western habits does have a party, but most of the Japanese, they have a party only with their own family, relatives or very close friends when they have a special event like birthday. So, they seldom party just for having fun or to mingle your friends with one another.

I’ve attended to these parties in western style since I got married with my husband, who is the Japanese language teacher, so I got used to it these days, but I love rather watching people than talking. I always wonder in a party room, ” For what is this party held?” or “For whom?” The host couple seemed quite busy, especially the wife was terribly occupied with so many things.  The party was almost end and some guests had already gone when she could have a seat with some cold lasagna finally. I could talk to her only when I was introduced to her by my husband. The most of the guest looked happy, maybe.  But I always wonder you really enjoy the party from the heart? Is it a kind of ritual thing?  Have you ever felt it as an obligation? No offence to the western custom but I just wonder what’s the real purpose to have a party? Have you ever been obsessed by not having a bad one?  Have you ever been worrying about the reputation about your party next day?  Doesn’t it bother you?

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Is my English old?

I’ve been teaching English to a mid school girl, and recently I found it on her school text book that they don’t learn the word ‘bicycle’ any more! In the text book, it says ‘ a bike ‘ for this.

 

Really? It’s a bit shocking to me….

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